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In the 3 weeks since delivery it seems my EQS has some charging compatibility issues. It will not charge with a Zappi 7kw and with a Hubsta/Elmtronics it charges at 3.6kw not 7.2 and there is nothing I can do. Our EQA is quite happy on both chargers. So far MB have not been at all helpful. Does anyone else have EQS compatibility issues?
 

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Had same problem.
no solution, because the onboard charger works 3 phases only, so 11 kW or 3.6 kW if one phase.
Almost all car (included EQA) pairs 2 onboard charger to achieve 7.2 kW when the one phase charging power is available.
b
But EQS can’t.
Extended the question to Mercedes headquarter but no solution.
So far, this is the only issue on car which is almost perfect.

had to change my home charge with a 3 phases one, because my home power is on 3 phases and moved my old one phase charger to my other EV (bmw i3s).
 

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Interesting. I am charging my EQS using a relatively cheap charger I got from AliExpress. 300.64US $ 44% OFF|11kw 16a 3 Phase Mobile Type 2 Electric Car Charger Ev Wallbox With Red Cee5 Pins Male Plug Free Adaptor Free Socket Suit Tesla - Chargers & Service Equipment - AliExpress It is fairly simple and you can use a Schucko adapter to plug into the regular 220V wall outlet. By the way, my EQS was delivered without a charger which is back-ordered due to a lack of chips. So, I am happy I bought this in anticipation of using it at home. I am waiting for the electrician to come to install a dedicated 3-phase plug in the garage. Unfortunately, my garage is on the same circuit as everything in my garden which includes a 2,500 watt well pump. The circuit breaker is limited to 16 Amps so I simply didn't have enough juice to charge the car and the garden stuff at the same time. In lieu of this, I ran an extension cord from a lightly used circuit inside the house (this house is unoccupied as we have 2 houses on the same property but I use that house's garage as it is more convenient) out to the garage. I still cannot charge at the full 16 Amps but this particular charge adapter lets you set the power by amperage and it works fine at 8 amps and is charging at 3.5kw. I am in no big hurry to charge up the car and am keeping it at 80%. We don't drive all that much and only need the larger capacity of the EQS for long trips which we do several a year. Otherwise, we drive less than 40 km a week.

I did see a detailed Youtube video from Munro looking in detail at the undercarriage and the actual charger used in the EQS is 9.6 KW only and not 11kw. So, at best that is what we will get on the standard charger. It looks pretty easy to swap it out for a 22kw one if and when that ever becomes available again.
 

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I meant the car was supplied without the charging adapter. It has a charger in the undercarriage. I know these wall boxes aren't chargers but are really just a way to route power to the plug and include safety checks. They are rate-limiting and some have fancy apps for scheduling. The EQS already has all that built-in so it is redundant to also have it on the charging adapter. I don't know what Mercedes is charging in other countries but the 22kw wall box here in Hungary is over $3k. Hence why I bought the cheap Chinese charging adapter.
 

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Had same problem.
no solution, because the onboard charger works 3 phases only, so 11 kW or 3.6 kW if one phase.
Almost all car (included EQA) pairs 2 onboard charger to achieve 7.2 kW when the one phase charging power is available.
b
But EQS can’t.
Extended the question to Mercedes headquarter but no solution.
So far, this is the only issue on car which is almost perfect.

had to change my home charge with a 3 phases one, because my home power is on 3 phases and moved my old one phase charger to my other EV (bmw i3s).
Not good and interesting for me as I'm still trying to wrestle a 22kw port option out of MB. With no success so far.

I have 3-phase but was not aware of that limitation. That's really poor if correct.
 

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I meant the car was supplied without the charging adapter. It has a charger in the undercarriage. I know these wall boxes aren't chargers but are really just a way to route power to the plug and include safety checks. They are rate-limiting and some have fancy apps for scheduling. The EQS already has all that built-in so it is redundant to also have it on the charging adapter. I don't know what Mercedes is charging in other countries but the 22kw wall box here in Hungary is over $3k. Hence why I bought the cheap Chinese charging adapter.
And is that new 22kw box actually available yet? I have been chasing MB assist and they keep saying 'not yet but soon' for UK market.

The price is outrageous. Especially as it does not really bring much special to the party that a Zappi, Andersen or Hypervolt could not handle.
 

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In the 3 weeks since delivery it seems my EQS has some charging compatibility issues. It will not charge with a Zappi 7kw and with a Hubsta/Elmtronics it charges at 3.6kw not 7.2 and there is nothing I can do. Our EQA is quite happy on both chargers. So far MB have not been at all helpful. Does anyone else have EQS compatibility issues?
Just noticed your post was early April. Did you receive any help or clarification/solution from MB yet?
 

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I can add that in our garage which shares electricity with the garden including a 2,500 watt submerged well pump, I can leave it to charge at the 8 amp rate and get 1.7 kw/h. I can't figure out the issue with the breakers in the house. That is our second house on the same plot of land and is unoccupied except for a couple of weeks a year when relatives visit (it is actually their house which we maintain). It has a 3-car garage so we use that for our car and the other 2 for lawn tractor, scaffolding, ladders, etc. There is a lot of powered garden equipment. A dethatcher, leaf vacuum, rototiller, push lawns mower, and a tractor. Anyway, I ran an extension cord from inside the house which is on an unused circuit that has a 25 amp breaker and it can't handle 16 amps. It fails roughly 3 minutes into the charge. However, the 25 meter extension cord is fairly warm (above 70 degrees) so maybe something is happening along those lines to cause the breaker to switch. The charging adapter I got from China permits setting the rate by amperage so at 8 amps it runs fine and doesn't cause the breaker to go off. So, until we get dedicated 16-amp lines for the charger I am stuck at 1.7 kw/h. That said it is actually fine for us in practical terms. We drove 350 km to Budapest and back for my wife's dental appointment there. That used 53% of the charge bringing it down from 80% to 27%. I have no clue what that is in kW terms as the car uses a percentage charge. But assuming that 80% of 108 kW is 86.4 kW and 27% is 29.2 kW then we used 57.2 kW for 350 km or 16.3/100km which isn't actually bad. If that holds true then we should expect to get over 700 km to a full charge. The in-town rate seems to be around 22 kW/100 km. It took 33 hours to recharge back to 80% but I didn't need to use the car for a few days so not a problem.

So; in realistic terms, we don't need a 22 kW charger on the car and the 11 kW should be fine for us. Even at 1.7kW it isn't an issue unless we had some reason to be driving a lot every day but as we are retired and don't do much driving except local shopping etc. Our electrician has pushed the day back a bit until 1 June for the installation of the 3-phase dedicated circuit. I had asked him to also research if we can get a meter just for the car. He works full-time for E.On and says they are completely disorganized when it comes to EV charging and whatever rules are in place or being implemented from on high at Brussels and ignored in Hungary which is the usual here. The EU passes all kinds of stuff which is very slow to get enacted locally if ever. Often the explanation is translation problems or Hungary just simply ignores it. I can think of a bunch of issues either botched on implementation such as traffic fine enforcement for non-Hungarian cars (no process exists so foreigners drive insane knowing they will never get a ticket in the mail). The drone rules, pilot licensing, fishing licenses, etc. are all non-compliant. The EU mandated that American driver's licenses be accepted equally but that also was never implemented (sadly on my part). There are a lot of things that Brussels mandates that get ignored completely. I am not actually sure why Hungary remains in the EU as they get no actual benefit anymore. Perhaps it is just to screw with them?
 

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I can add that in our garage which shares electricity with the garden including a 2,500 watt submerged well pump, I can leave it to charge at the 8 amp rate and get 1.7 kw/h. I can't figure out the issue with the breakers in the house. That is our second house on the same plot of land and is unoccupied except for a couple of weeks a year when relatives visit (it is actually their house which we maintain). It has a 3-car garage so we use that for our car and the other 2 for lawn tractor, scaffolding, ladders, etc. There is a lot of powered garden equipment. A dethatcher, leaf vacuum, rototiller, push lawns mower, and a tractor. Anyway, I ran an extension cord from inside the house which is on an unused circuit that has a 25 amp breaker and it can't handle 16 amps. It fails roughly 3 minutes into the charge. However, the 25 meter extension cord is fairly warm (above 70 degrees) so maybe something is happening along those lines to cause the breaker to switch. The charging adapter I got from China permits setting the rate by amperage so at 8 amps it runs fine and doesn't cause the breaker to go off. So, until we get dedicated 16-amp lines for the charger I am stuck at 1.7 kw/h. That said it is actually fine for us in practical terms. We drove 350 km to Budapest and back for my wife's dental appointment there. That used 53% of the charge bringing it down from 80% to 27%. I have no clue what that is in kW terms as the car uses a percentage charge. But assuming that 80% of 108 kW is 86.4 kW and 27% is 29.2 kW then we used 57.2 kW for 350 km or 16.3/100km which isn't actually bad. If that holds true then we should expect to get over 700 km to a full charge. The in-town rate seems to be around 22 kW/100 km. It took 33 hours to recharge back to 80% but I didn't need to use the car for a few days so not a problem.

So; in realistic terms, we don't need a 22 kW charger on the car and the 11 kW should be fine for us. Even at 1.7kW it isn't an issue unless we had some reason to be driving a lot every day but as we are retired and don't do much driving except local shopping etc. Our electrician has pushed the day back a bit until 1 June for the installation of the 3-phase dedicated circuit. I had asked him to also research if we can get a meter just for the car. He works full-time for E.On and says they are completely disorganized when it comes to EV charging and whatever rules are in place or being implemented from on high at Brussels and ignored in Hungary which is the usual here. The EU passes all kinds of stuff which is very slow to get enacted locally if ever. Often the explanation is translation problems or Hungary just simply ignores it. I can think of a bunch of issues either botched on implementation such as traffic fine enforcement for non-Hungarian cars (no process exists so foreigners drive insane knowing they will never get a ticket in the mail). The drone rules, pilot licensing, fishing licenses, etc. are all non-compliant. The EU mandated that American driver's licenses be accepted equally but that also was never implemented (sadly on my part). There are a lot of things that Brussels mandates that get ignored completely. I am not actually sure why Hungary remains in the EU as they get no actual benefit anymore. Perhaps it is just to screw with them?
Being honest Borscherlh, I think very few folks indeed actually 'need' 22kw. Unless you are running an electric taxi running three shifts or doing airport limo work. It's just nice to engineer in the optimum from day one if you can. For me at least. For me, being able to get up and know you can drive from the bad lands of rural Shropshire to the center of London and back without being obliged to find a charger.

I had a discussion with some folks on one of the EV pages. They seem obsessed with range in absolute sense whereas a few of us felt that a more reasonable and sensible measurement is if you can do your daily commute or longest regular round trip. I think that is a more realistic measure. And the EQS does work on that basis.

The infrastructure there seems challenging. In Germany I believe 3-phase, 100 amp is near standard to each newer house. And if it's not there, it's easy and cheap to add.

Here in the 51st state called the UK, it's far from standard except on much larger properties, but fairly easy to have installed and if you life in a mainstream sort of property, not a huge price to install. If you off-road some then that figure can grow exponentially. I've put the 3-phase 100 amp supply in and it was far from costly. Even with new smart meter and consumer unit.

And it varies around Europe quite a bit. So it's fair to say 22kw AC is something of a niche market (so far) and indeed not so many cars having the facility outside of Germany and a little bit here. Think in the US it's largely unheard of domestically. Audi, MB, Renault Zoe and I believe earlier gen Tesla's have it. Hyundai is doing some interesting stuff with VTG. Way ahead of MB and the like. VTG is available on the EQS in Japan where they use the Chamondo? charger connection not the CCS one we see.
 

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I actually think the 51st state is Israel but you can be the 52nd. :)

In Hungary all houses have 3-phase standard BUT each separate incoming line is limited to 16 amps which is then distributed down on the panel and all the breakers are 16 amp as well. So, if you actually push the system it can't cope. For example, if I run the sauna and the washing machine at the same time one of the phases blows. The same for our electric water kettle and anything else. I am going to try and con him into putting in 25 amp breakers on the 3-phases while he is here. I have one phase at 25 amps already but the other 2 are 16 amps. You can do this but they are sealed. The wiring is large enough to accommodate it but you have to do it through E.On and a licensed electrician approved to break the seals on the lines. The added cost to upgrade the circuit breaker from 16 amps to 25 amps is 150,000 HUF per phase ($416). We have nothing like a smart meter although E.On went digital a few years ago. Not all the way though. They do it one meter at a time and I still have a mix of old school and digital. It has been a few years since any were upgraded so they probably ran out of money to do this work.

Billing in Hungary can be done in 2 ways. The first is an annualized monthly payment based on average annual consumption. Then there is a reckoning in December when E.On send is a guy to read each meter and make a photo of the readings I have to witness and sign. The other method we do is I read each meter and put the data online and then pay the amount due. I prefer this method as they cannot carry a credit on your account and you get a refund literally in cash from the Postman which is an enormous pain. We have a total of 10 electrical meters and 3 gas meters I read on the 11th every month. The water is very different and done locally. E.On hasn't gotten their prying fingers into that market yet. The advantage to this is I get to see the consumption monthly and take action if something is out of normal. It does happen. The water is much harder as the meters are underground in deep boxes you have to climb down to read. We have 3 of these. They are old-school gauges. The water system is wearing out in our city so leaks happen a lot and you can have a disastrous bill if you don't pay attention. If the leak is in front of the meter it is on the city but if behind it is on me. I have in both houses Grohe smart valves that monitor water consumption for leaks and they shut off the flow if something unusual happens or even for detected micro-leaks. So, this old Soviet era stuff is finally wearing out and slowly getting replaced. But, smart meters are way off in the future. The one house has too many meters as it was divided into 3 apartments which we put back into a single house. NOw we have 3 sets of meters for that house when we only need one. I asked to have them removed (it would save them billing costs) but it would cost me roughly $1,200 to get time removed by E.On. So, screw them they can deal with reading all these meters. I am not a big fan of E.On.

The electrician will do the 3-phase outlet for me for roughly $1000 but it will be done quasi legally as he normally works for E.On but this is being done off book. If he can install a meter for this as well then it will cost another $400. He openly has to run the cables about 10 meters from the main distribution box so relatively easy to do. If I went the official route it would probably be a few years before they came around to do the work. In Hungary, if you want to get something done you do it the black way.
 

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I actually think the 51st state is Israel but you can be the 52nd. :)

In Hungary all houses have 3-phase standard BUT each separate incoming line is limited to 16 amps which is then distributed down on the panel and all the breakers are 16 amp as well. So, if you actually push the system it can't cope. For example, if I run the sauna and the washing machine at the same time one of the phases blows. The same for our electric water kettle and anything else. I am going to try and con him into putting in 25 amp breakers on the 3-phases while he is here. I have one phase at 25 amps already but the other 2 are 16 amps. You can do this but they are sealed. The wiring is large enough to accommodate it but you have to do it through E.On and a licensed electrician approved to break the seals on the lines. The added cost to upgrade the circuit breaker from 16 amps to 25 amps is 150,000 HUF per phase ($416). We have nothing like a smart meter although E.On went digital a few years ago. Not all the way though. They do it one meter at a time and I still have a mix of old school and digital. It has been a few years since any were upgraded so they probably ran out of money to do this work.

Billing in Hungary can be done in 2 ways. The first is an annualized monthly payment based on average annual consumption. Then there is a reckoning in December when E.On send is a guy to read each meter and make a photo of the readings I have to witness and sign. The other method we do is I read each meter and put the data online and then pay the amount due. I prefer this method as they cannot carry a credit on your account and you get a refund literally in cash from the Postman which is an enormous pain. We have a total of 10 electrical meters and 3 gas meters I read on the 11th every month. The water is very different and done locally. E.On hasn't gotten their prying fingers into that market yet. The advantage to this is I get to see the consumption monthly and take action if something is out of normal. It does happen. The water is much harder as the meters are underground in deep boxes you have to climb down to read. We have 3 of these. They are old-school gauges. The water system is wearing out in our city so leaks happen a lot and you can have a disastrous bill if you don't pay attention. If the leak is in front of the meter it is on the city but if behind it is on me. I have in both houses Grohe smart valves that monitor water consumption for leaks and they shut off the flow if something unusual happens or even for detected micro-leaks. So, this old Soviet era stuff is finally wearing out and slowly getting replaced. But, smart meters are way off in the future. The one house has too many meters as it was divided into 3 apartments which we put back into a single house. NOw we have 3 sets of meters for that house when we only need one. I asked to have them removed (it would save them billing costs) but it would cost me roughly $1,200 to get time removed by E.On. So, screw them they can deal with reading all these meters. I am not a big fan of E.On.

The electrician will do the 3-phase outlet for me for roughly $1000 but it will be done quasi legally as he normally works for E.On but this is being done off book. If he can install a meter for this as well then it will cost another $400. He openly has to run the cables about 10 meters from the main distribution box so relatively easy to do. If I went the official route it would probably be a few years before they came around to do the work. In Hungary, if you want to get something done you do it the black way.
Bloody hell we not even an extension of the US now but second in line! So much for the special relationship :) mind you, given the way we are being led and our laughable presence on the world stage, I think we'd best take 52nd!

Sounds like a plan getting the 3-phase especially at those prices. And even if they didn't advise you well on the 22kw, then 11kw at full bore is still worthwhile stuff. Especially as the EQS isn't the fastest charging.

Complex approach to electrical distribution they seem to have there.
 
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