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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Apologies .... here we go. The chart mid section will not copy for come reason. Have screen shot it and added in.

Only one electric car can beat 'range anxiety' and make it to the North
And only six can make it from London to Newcastle without needing to charge
ByLauren Almeida and Melissa Lawford7 April 2022 • 5:00am

Mercedes-AMG EQS 53 4MATIC

The Mercedes EQS is the best option for those wanting to travel long distances CREDIT: Mercedes-Benz AG/MediaPortal Daimler AG
Just one of the 20 most popular electric vehicles can make the journey from London to Edinburgh on a single charge, despite the Government’s attempts to persuade drivers to switch to greener vehicles.
More than 190,000 electric cars were sold in Britain last year and they accounted for about 11.6pc of total sales, according to the Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders. However, there are still significant drawbacks to electric cars.
Many potential users have “range anxiety”: they fear batteries will run flat before the destination is reached. This could mean stopping for hours mid-journey to recharge. Almost two thirds of the population have concerns over the distance an electric car can travel between charges, according to Cazoo, a car website.
New research found that only six of the 20 most popular electric vehicles can make the journey from London to Newcastle on a single charge.
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High-profile models that cannot make the 283-mile journey without a stop to recharge include the Hyundai Kona, BMW iX xDrive40 and Nissan Leaf, according to research compiled by the car website Auto Trader for Telegraph Money.
Cars that are able to make the journey include the Mercedes EQS, the Kia EV6 and the Ford Mustang Mach-E, according to Auto Trader. But only the Mercedes can make the 404-mile journey from London to Edinburgh on a single charge. The car has an estimated range of 419 miles.
Most popular electric cars
Bar chart with 2 data series.
Electric vehicle ranges and advert views compared
View as data table, Most popular electric cars
The chart has 1 X axis displaying categories.
The chart has 2 Y axes displaying Estimated range (miles) and Number of advert views.

Product Font Line Rectangle Screenshot



MOST POPULAR ELECTRIC CARS
Electric vehicle ranges and advert views compared
Estimated range (miles)
End of interactive chart.
While none of the most recent Tesla models – the 3, S, Y and X – was among the most sought after on the Auto Trader website, as a result of their high price tag, none of these vehicles could make the trip from London to Edinburgh on a single charge, the research found.
However, Rupert Pontin of Cazoo said while most electric cars struggled to make the journey from London to the North, the typical driver usually made much shorter journeys.
“While there are still a number of people with concerns over the distance an electric car can travel, the latest models coming to the market have a much better range – many cars are now capable of travelling more than 250 miles on one charge,” he said. “This may not take you to Edinburgh in one go, but it is worth remembering that the average journey in Britain is 8.4 miles.”
Auto Trader found that range anxiety remained a barrier to entry for most motorists: almost half of 2,000 car buyers surveyed indicated that the lack of charging infrastructure was their primary barrier to making the switch to an electric car.
There are around 28,000 chargers across the country, but estimates suggest that around 280,000 to 480,000 chargers will be needed to fulfil demand from drivers by next year.
Last month a report from the National Infrastructure Commission warned that there was a “real risk” to the plan to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030 because of the slow progress of installing new electric chargers.
It said that Britain’s charging network was “significantly behind where it needs to be” and that without more chargers drivers “will not have the confidence to make the switch to electric vehicles”.
Ford Mustang Mach 1 2021_12

The Ford Mustang Mach-E is one of only six cars that can make it from London to Newcastle without stopping
Another problem is charging time. While it takes a few minutes to fill up a car at a petrol station, EVs need at least half an hour to charge. It takes 34 minutes to charge a BMW iX xDrive40 from 0pc to 80pc at a 150kW fast-charging station.
But there are big variations depending on what kind of charger is available. For a Hyundai Kona with a 64 kWh battery, it takes six hours and 50 minutes to charge from 10pc to 100pc with a 10.5kW charger. With a 7kW charger, the charging time jumps by 35pc to nine hours and 15 minutes.
These times are so long partly because the final 20pc of charge is very slow. With a 50kW charger, and charging only from 10pc to 80pc, the same car would charge in 64 minutes.
For both a Fiat 500e and a Vauxhall Mokka-e, charging from 0pc to 80pc with a 100kW charger takes 30 minutes. These times double to an hour if you want to charge to 100pc.
Manufacturers typically recommend keeping the battery charged between 10pc and 80pc. Mercedes said this is the optimum level to protect the battery. Weather conditions and temperature can also affect charging times.

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Only one electric car can beat 'range anxiety' and make it to the North
 

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Apologies .... here we go. The chart mid section will not copy for come reason. Have screen shot it and added in.

Only one electric car can beat 'range anxiety' and make it to the North
And only six can make it from London to Newcastle without needing to charge
ByLauren Almeida and Melissa Lawford7 April 2022 • 5:00am

Mercedes-AMG EQS 53 4MATIC

The Mercedes EQS is the best option for those wanting to travel long distances CREDIT: Mercedes-Benz AG/MediaPortal Daimler AG
Just one of the 20 most popular electric vehicles can make the journey from London to Edinburgh on a single charge, despite the Government’s attempts to persuade drivers to switch to greener vehicles.
More than 190,000 electric cars were sold in Britain last year and they accounted for about 11.6pc of total sales, according to the Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders. However, there are still significant drawbacks to electric cars.
Many potential users have “range anxiety”: they fear batteries will run flat before the destination is reached. This could mean stopping for hours mid-journey to recharge. Almost two thirds of the population have concerns over the distance an electric car can travel between charges, according to Cazoo, a car website.
New research found that only six of the 20 most popular electric vehicles can make the journey from London to Newcastle on a single charge.
Advertisement


High-profile models that cannot make the 283-mile journey without a stop to recharge include the Hyundai Kona, BMW iX xDrive40 and Nissan Leaf, according to research compiled by the car website Auto Trader for Telegraph Money.
Cars that are able to make the journey include the Mercedes EQS, the Kia EV6 and the Ford Mustang Mach-E, according to Auto Trader. But only the Mercedes can make the 404-mile journey from London to Edinburgh on a single charge. The car has an estimated range of 419 miles.
Most popular electric cars
Bar chart with 2 data series.
Electric vehicle ranges and advert views compared
View as data table, Most popular electric cars
The chart has 1 X axis displaying categories.
The chart has 2 Y axes displaying Estimated range (miles) and Number of advert views.

View attachment 1195


MOST POPULAR ELECTRIC CARS
Electric vehicle ranges and advert views compared
Estimated range (miles)
End of interactive chart.
While none of the most recent Tesla models – the 3, S, Y and X – was among the most sought after on the Auto Trader website, as a result of their high price tag, none of these vehicles could make the trip from London to Edinburgh on a single charge, the research found.
However, Rupert Pontin of Cazoo said while most electric cars struggled to make the journey from London to the North, the typical driver usually made much shorter journeys.
“While there are still a number of people with concerns over the distance an electric car can travel, the latest models coming to the market have a much better range – many cars are now capable of travelling more than 250 miles on one charge,” he said. “This may not take you to Edinburgh in one go, but it is worth remembering that the average journey in Britain is 8.4 miles.”
Auto Trader found that range anxiety remained a barrier to entry for most motorists: almost half of 2,000 car buyers surveyed indicated that the lack of charging infrastructure was their primary barrier to making the switch to an electric car.
There are around 28,000 chargers across the country, but estimates suggest that around 280,000 to 480,000 chargers will be needed to fulfil demand from drivers by next year.
Last month a report from the National Infrastructure Commission warned that there was a “real risk” to the plan to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030 because of the slow progress of installing new electric chargers.
It said that Britain’s charging network was “significantly behind where it needs to be” and that without more chargers drivers “will not have the confidence to make the switch to electric vehicles”.
Ford Mustang Mach 1 2021_12

The Ford Mustang Mach-E is one of only six cars that can make it from London to Newcastle without stopping
Another problem is charging time. While it takes a few minutes to fill up a car at a petrol station, EVs need at least half an hour to charge. It takes 34 minutes to charge a BMW iX xDrive40 from 0pc to 80pc at a 150kW fast-charging station.
But there are big variations depending on what kind of charger is available. For a Hyundai Kona with a 64 kWh battery, it takes six hours and 50 minutes to charge from 10pc to 100pc with a 10.5kW charger. With a 7kW charger, the charging time jumps by 35pc to nine hours and 15 minutes.
These times are so long partly because the final 20pc of charge is very slow. With a 50kW charger, and charging only from 10pc to 80pc, the same car would charge in 64 minutes.
For both a Fiat 500e and a Vauxhall Mokka-e, charging from 0pc to 80pc with a 100kW charger takes 30 minutes. These times double to an hour if you want to charge to 100pc.
Manufacturers typically recommend keeping the battery charged between 10pc and 80pc. Mercedes said this is the optimum level to protect the battery. Weather conditions and temperature can also affect charging times.

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Only one electric car can beat 'range anxiety' and make it to the North
Thanks. Pretty vague regarding the Model S LR and the Taycan. I tested the Taycan on a 400 mile trip and it way outperformed its rating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks. Pretty vague regarding the Model S LR and the Taycan. I tested the Taycan on a 400 mile trip and it way outperformed its rating.
Interesting about the Taycan. I did order and pay for the Audi GT last Summer but eventually cancelled due to the most appalling electrical and product support and knowledge from the dealership and indeed Audi. The hard product when we tested it was first class. The organisation a lot less so.

Order is in for the EQS but if I'm honest, the support and service is only marginally better than Audi with no build dates (after 2 months on order) , promise (or even estimate) dates and zero knowledge on 22kw options.
 

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Interesting about the Taycan. I did order and pay for the Audi GT last Summer but eventually cancelled due to the most appalling electrical and product support and knowledge from the dealership and indeed Audi. The hard product when we tested it was first class. The organisation a lot less so.

Order is in for the EQS but if I'm honest, the support and service is only marginally better than Audi with no build dates (after 2 months on order) , promise (or even estimate) dates and zero knowledge on 22kw options.
In terms of dealer and parent knowledge, Mercedes is no better. Neither the four dealers in Phoenix (sales/support/parts) nor the EQS specialists at MB USA know a darn thing about this car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
In terms of dealer and parent knowledge, Mercedes is no better. Neither the four dealers in Phoenix (sales/support/parts) nor the EQS specialists at MB USA know a darn thing about this car.
In the nicest possible way I'm pleased to know about that. I.e it's not just me :)

No of course I don't want the support / service you get to be diluted in any way but it does mirror my experience here in the UK.

No product option awareness, poor sales experience, zero basic electrical awareness .... no comprehension between AC/DC, single phase, 3 phase, 11kw, 22kw. And it's precisely the same with on-line support. Although I should be fair and say that Mercedes Assist on-line whilst slow and not providing the desired answers .... did at least come back with considered, accurate technical and lead time answers.

It's a woeful experience trying to spend 150k .... in pounds or dollars it seems.
 
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