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We've seen the order guide for the EQE Sedan. Anyone know of the same document for the SUV yet? Production isn't that far away for this to still be unknown!
This week I configured an EQE 500 Sedan on the German configurator with the options I would like in the EQE 500 SUV. After converting the amount from Euros to Dollars and deducting VAT the configuration came to about $90K. I am hoping that the SUV is within a few thousand dollars of that number.
 

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I expect so. Interestingly the EQS 580, which is the bestseller EQS version in Germany for saloon and SUV, is starting price saloon 139k (Euro) compared SUV is a bit cheaper 135k. Though other versions like 450 the opposite is the case.

Also EQS 580 performance is similar (4.3sec saloon compared 4.6sec SUV 0-100kph), same top speed 210kph, same charging time.

Turning circle is even smaller in SUV (11m compared 11.9m in saloon).

Range and efficiency about 12% less in 602km EQS SUV vs 681km saloon but interior room and ground clearance improved which seem the major difference. Some of the cheaper SUVs (450) even have similar range to the more expensive (580) saloons, if don't require explosive acceleration.
 

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Well spotted, LAZARU5. I think you may have helped catch a Mercedes error I passed on without noticing, as I have come to the conclusion SUV and saloon have similar turning circle as measured by Mercedes. I think the measurement method used by Mercedes excludes length of car. It is curb to curb instead of wall to wall. So measured by tyre track instead of vehicle outside edge.


Here is confirmation that measurement is curb to curb:

Saloon and SUV both have same wheelbase yet almost identical turning circle I have found from checking other sources of informarion besides the Mercedes Germany configurator. The figures quoted earlier for turning circle were from configuration summary page for both 580 EQS vehicles both with rear wheel steering. Yet I think the configurator may not be comparing like with like as this page says saloon can be as low as 10.9m with 10 degree rear axle steering or 11.9m with 4.5 degree rear-axle steering:


And with 4.5 degree axle steering SUV turning circle is 11.9m compared 11m with 10 degree rear axle steering:


Therefore turning circle seems similar for SUV and saloon, which makes sense given their identical wheelbase. Given that saloon is longer as you say the measurement method doesn't take length into account so must be the curb to curb method. The wall to wall method should be longer for saloon as you say.
 

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By the way EQE has an improved turning circle compared EQS so the EQE SUV will likely be the same. Without any rear axle steering EQE would have a 12.5m turning circle, compared 11.6m with 4.5 degree rear axle steering or 10.7m with 10 degree rear axle steering.

 

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Originally I assumed that customers could select no rear steering, 4.5 degree, or 10 degree rear steering unless the car was equipped with staggered wheels, in which case 4.5 degrees is the limit. But if I am following the German EQE sedan configurator correctly, it appears that the 10 degree steering option may also require selecting the Premium Package as a minimum. The 4.5 degree rear steering appears to be standard on the EQE 500 sedan. Not sure about the 300 and 350 models.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I'm not yet appreciating the value nor possible future repair costs associated with rear wheel steering. In our location, space is plentiful for turning, so the additional advantage does not seem worth it. Parallel parking is not a challenge. Am I missing some other benefit for an EQE350 model?
 

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The value proposition for rear wheel steering is not the same for every driver. I noticed in California that the parking spots are not as wide as they are here in Pennsylvania. California drivers will probably appreciate the feature more than drivers in some other States. People using wider handicap parking spaces may not find the rear steering option of much use.
 

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As noted by LAZARU5, in some locations, AWS (all wheel steer) has extra advantages.

Modern electronically controlled systems should have more reliability and dynamic superiority than the older hydraulic systems that would decalibrate over time.

Due to improved safety and maneuverability, AWS may reduce repair costs for some people overall. Also I haven't yet experienced a front steering fault yet so I hope same for rear wheels.

Some AWS systems will have advantages such as-
Better able to avoid a pothole or other unexpected obstacle such as evasive maneuvers at motorway speeds.
Less likely to fishtail or get stuck in some road conditions.
Easier steering to keep direction during wind gusts or to maintain a straight line generally.
Less body lean when cornering.

 
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