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Things I don't like after the first longer drive

571 Views 8 Replies 4 Participants Last post by  galimpic
I've finally had some time to drive the car a little more today for the first time. We all know the good - very quiet, adequate acceleration, good seats, great sound. many features... but here are some things I didn't like about driving mods and the semi-autonomous driving that may be useful to someone who plans to test drive it, so they can pay more attention to some of the things that are difficult to assess in a short drive:

I can't really find a good coasting mode:

  • D+ mode (coasting) is difficult to use with any traffic around, since you have to switch the pedals too often
  • D mode (standard recuperation) is set up as with very mild recuperation, I assume it was to emulate how regular auto transmission slowly loses speed on idle, but it also makes you use the brake a lot, so it is not a good compromise
  • D- mode (strong recuperation) should work best for those who want to use 1-pedal driving (avoid pressing the brake pedal), but a problem here is that with the accelerator pedal being very hard to press, and with this mode having the first part of the travel of the pedal reserved for deceleration, it is always pushing back on your foot and you can't rest on it, so the foot gets tired quickly, making it almost unusable, except in stop and go traffic. Also, the brake pedal is moving as it's decelerating so when you want to use, suddenly it's not where you expect it to be.
  • D auto mode is very weird and you never know what to expect, going from string recuperation with a car in front of you, only to freely coast the next second when and you just don't know what to expect from the car.

The solution I use for the above is to simply use ACC as much as possible and let the car take care of those pedals.

As for the lane centering, it only works with visible lane markings on both sides, and only above a certain speed, so basically you have to be on a wide, good street or a freeway. However, maximum turning force during lane centering is very mild, so it tends to go over lane markings if there is a curve, therefore the road should also be rather straight. Also, if there is a break in the markings (e.g. in the middle of an intersection) it doesn't figure out how to interpolate the path but just continues straight until it catches the markings again on the other side, so you often end up in between lanes, or have to manually steer through that section. This one I "solved" by actually being more active with steering even in semi-automatic mode. A good thing is that it won't turn it off if you steer yourself (like some other cars) - it will simply reengage after you're done with a difficult section of the road.

I am sure as the time passes I will get more used to it, but MB seems to need a few more model years to get it right.
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After nearly 16000 miles I decided to leave the assist features turned off and recuperation set to the default mild setting. I am happy using only Distronic Cruise and Blind Spot Assist. I don't have to change any settings when I start driving and the EQS handles predictably. I also no longer waste any time cleaning brake dust off the rear wheels like I did when Steering Assist and Lane Keep Assist were turned on.
Thank you for the feedback. I'm not clear on your comment for D+ mode. Is the amount of pedal switching any greater than driving a conventional gas engine vehicle? With one automatic and one manual trans in my garage, I can't imagine I'm switching pedals more than with either of those, each of which is fine for me. Again, for D Mode, are you using the brake more than in a gas engine car?

Is the mode you describe as "D auto" the so-called "Intelligent" mode?
Thank you for the feedback. I'm not clear on your comment for D+ mode. Is the amount of pedal switching any greater than driving a conventional gas engine vehicle? With one automatic and one manual trans in my garage, I can't imagine I'm switching pedals more than with either of those, each of which is fine for me. Again, for D Mode, are you using the brake more than in a gas engine car?
It is greater than gas cars since in D+ mode when it's freely coasting there is no internal transmission friction and coupled with stronger inertia due to weight it means the car will go forward for miles with very little speed loss, so it's very likely you will have to brake eventually, while other cars actually slow down relatively quickly when coasting. This is what I think they tried to emulate with the D mode, by introducing some regeneration.

Is the mode you describe as "D auto" the so-called "Intelligent" mode?
Yes, and they also use the term "ECO assist" in the user manual.
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It is greater than gas cars since in D+ mode when it's freely coasting there is no internal transmission friction and coupled with stronger inertia due to weight it means the car will go forward for miles with very little speed loss, so it's very likely you will have to brake eventually, while other cars actually slow down relatively quickly when coasting. This is what I think they tried to emulate with the D mode, by introducing some regeneration.



Yes, and they also use the term "ECO assist" in the user manual.
It would seem (I'm guessing) that D+ would allow for the smoothest ride with no unexpected braking/forward head bobble when the vehicle is attempting to recuperate energy. The driver can smoothly and evenly apply brakes when anticipating the need. I'm not at all concerned with recuperation given my use case of local driving and recharging at home, but avoiding motion sickness for all riders from sudden or excessive brake forces, especially unexpected, is the higher priority. From your experience, does this logic make sense?
It would seem (I'm guessing) that D+ would allow for the smoothest ride with no unexpected braking/forward head bobble when the vehicle is attempting to recuperate energy. The driver can smoothly and evenly apply brakes when anticipating the need. I'm not at all concerned with recuperation given my use case of local driving and recharging at home, but avoiding motion sickness for all riders from sudden or excessive brake forces, especially unexpected, is the higher priority. From your experience, does this logic make sense?
It does, in case you don't have a problem using both pedals all the time. However, I find that once a driver discovers and gets used to one-pedal driving, it's hard to go back.... I am an example of that. Obviously, it is individual, so for you it may be perfect. In fact, it is rare that free coasting is offered with today's EVs. The only other one I am aware of is Ioniq 5, but in that mode it does NOT use blended braking, so there is no recuperation at all, while it seems that EQ always breaks with the motor when it can during braking action.

Even thought I prefer one pedal driving, with EQE I may start using that free coasting mode since iit is the only way to drive it where I can rest my foot on the accelerator without having to actively push with lower leg muscles just to have the pedal depressed enough.
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The problem I had with the accelerator pedal is no more! I was playing with seat settings and after I lowered only the front part, I found that in that position and angle more pressure is naturally applied with the same force, so now I can drive in one pedal mode again :)
D auto as it is called in the EQC is in my opinion the best mode but you need to adapt your driving or rather you need to anticipate and not be surprised by what the car does. in effect the car uses the camera and map information inc your programmed route if using the navigation system to use regen and coasting to the most optimum. The car will slow on bends and at junctions with the driver just needing to bring the car to a stop if need be. You get a signal when to lift off the gas pedal in anticipation of said bends etc. I do not find the car slows excessively or uncomfortable and have become so attuned to it is second nature for me to drive “with” the car so to speak. I tend to use the speed limiter on our roads so still have to accelerate cruise control is just not appropriate but I use that on our motorways with no problem.
It willbe interesting to see if there is much difference between my version 1 and the later version in the EQE.
I agree that "D auto" can be great once you get used to it and anticipate what it will do as it changes the regeneration. I try to use it as much as I can in order to get used to it, but for now my favorite is one-pedal (D-), which is totally predictable. I'm even starting to like the auto-sinking brake pedal in that mode, kind of tells me "if you press more, you will use actual brakes".
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